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  • Why was this site started?

    slide06.jpgLet us begin with a very important fact. The goal of the site is not to criticize traditional or institutional churches. Yes, some of the articles make comparisons and some of the writers do strongly question traditional practices. However, those of us who have created this site did so for several reasons:

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    bestartikle.jWe have over one hundred articles available on our site, so if you are a new visitor, you may be overwhelmed. Where should you start? Here you will find some of our best articles that we have posted since the s...

  • What is 'simple church'?

    slide02.jpgSome call them house churches. Some call them organic churches. Some call them simple churches. We prefer to just call them churches. They are rapidly multiplying, simple communities of believers, meeting in homes, offices, campuses, wherever God is moving. This is the pattern common to many parts of the globe, and is now becoming more and more common in the U.S. as well.

  • Incarnational Practices

    slide05.jpgYou are church before you do church. This is one of the fueling insights of the missional church movement. This isn't a new idea...but it is pretty provocative, especially when one considers its implications. If we take Jesus at his word when he says (as recorded in John 20:21) "as the Father has sent me, I am sending you," then we realize that our being sent is the basis of our "doing" church. In oth...

  • What is an Organic Church?

    slide04.jpg Organic Church. I've been using this term for around fifteen years now. Today it's become somewhat of a clay word, being molded and shaped to mean a variety of different things by a variety of different people.

    T. Austin-Sparks is the man who deserves credit for this term. Here's his definition:


The Importance of Circles PDF Print Write e-mail
Wednesday, 25 June 2014 00:23

When I look at a city, I don’t focus on neighborhoods or individuals or even centers of power.

Instead, I look for circles.

Each circle I find is unique.
Sometimes a circle is a family, sometimes it is a group of friends, sometimes it is a group that works together, and other times it is a group that plays together.
Here is why these circles are important: with one exception, circles are just like a local church.

  • Circles have a leadership structure and a decision making process
  • Circles have a sense of history, identity, purpose and future
  • Circles have members who care for one another

The only thing that circles are missing is Christ.

When Christ becomes the center of a given circle, that circle becomes a church.

That is why Jesus sends his disciples to existing circles (Luke 10:5-7), which Luke calls households. The results of Jesus’ strategy emerge throughout the book of Acts:

  • Cornelius and his household are saved (Acts 10, 11:1-18)
  • Lydia and her household are saved (Acts 16:11-15)
  • The Philippian jailer and his household are saved (Acts 16:22-34)
  • Crispus and his household are saved (Acts 18:1-8)

And that is why I look for circles, too.
Your turn:

  1. What do you focus on when you look at your city?
  2. What are the advantages of transforming an existing circle into a church?
  3. How does your disciple making strategy incorporate the importance of circles?


Share your thoughts and make it a conversation!

Kirk Anderson

  • I inspire disciple makers through training, coaching and writing to think and act strategically to reach their cities with the Gospel.
  • Inspiring disciple makers to think and act strategically.

http://udmms.com/about/simple-church

 
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